All Posts in the ‘Deserts and Outback’ Category

Upper Antelope Canyon, Arizona, USA

Do you speak Navajo? If not, then you are like me and probably didn’t know that “Tse’ bighanilini” means “the place where the water runs through the rock” and is a name of one of the most amazing places in the world. Unlike many others, it is a simple and meaningful name, however, it doesn’t explain why this canyon is so popular and attracts hundreds of tourists each day.

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The Lake Pamamaroo, NSW, Australia

Intense colours – these two words always come to my mind when I think about Australian Outback – red soil and incredibly clear deep blue sky mixed with ancient landscapes create amazing scenery. If you add some lakes and rivers to this mix, you get something even more outstanding – and I will not be surprised if it was one of the unofficial reasons why Menindee Lakes System was constructed …

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White Cliffs Solar Power Station, NSW, Australia

Australian Outback will always be one of my favourite places to travel to – this huge almost deserted land is covered by various natural and human-made gems which, I believe, must be visited by any conscious traveller. Yes, distances between these places are great, but it only adds more fun to it.

White Cliffs Power Station is located in the small outback town White Cliffs in the middle of NSW outback, 280 kilometres from Broken Hill and 1000 kilometres from Sydney.

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Monument Valley, Arizona, USA

Up until June 2009, every time when I saw an image of the Monument Valley, saw it in the movie or read an article about this great place, I was telling to myself that one day I’d definitely visit this great area. Fortunately it is not the case anymore – another great location pinned and marked on the world map.

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Turret Arch, Arches National Park, Utah, USA

I think that it is very rare when a name of the national park actually describes what you are going to see in that location. This park is one of those literally named places: here, you will see … arches, and lots of them – there are more than 2000 registered natural sandstone arches. Just think about it – not one, not ten, not even hundred – more than two thousands!

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